Mmmmm: M&M’s @75

Plain or peanut. (Or even better, peanut butter.) If those flavors sound familiar, they should. For 75 years, those circular, candy-coated, button-like candies, otherwise known to us as M&M’s,® have been delighting our taste buds.

As one of the most recognizable candies for decades, the brand turns 75 this year. Along with showcasing its most popular characters and colors – Red and Yellow – M&M’s is introducing new colors and flavors, textures and fillings, special packaging and many promotions to refresh the brand. You can design your own M&M’s too.

M&M’s candies, 75th anniversary of M&M’s, popular confections, M&M’s Mars history, history of popular candy, official candy of WWII, M&M’s brand, custom M&M’s

To keep the chocolates relevant for the health conscience, the brand will begin the transition from artificial to natural flavors which is expected to take several years. Will M&M’s taste the same? That is the question.

A few of the many clever attributes of the M&M’s brand is that they’re not only tasty snacks, but they’re fun, and fun to eat (like popcorn). The brand has also succeeded in turning the candy into personalities.

M&M’s history

M&M’s candies, 75th anniversary of M&M’s, popular confections, M&M’s Mars history, history of popular candy, official candy of WWII, M&M’s brand, custom M&M’s

M&M’s candies, 75th anniversary of M&M’s, popular confections, M&M’s Mars history, history of popular candy, official candy of WWII, M&M’s brand, custom M&M’s

The candy has an interesting history. Forrest Mars, Sr. modeled M&M’s after the British-made Smarties: Chocolate pellets with a hard, colored shell that prevented the candies from melting. Mars received a patent for his version in 1941, and along with Hershey Chocolate’s president William F. R. Murrie, the product became M&M’s.

Shortly after the company began production in Newark, NJ, the candy was packaged in tubes and became a favorite of American GIs serving in WWII. The military recognized that the candy had a practical side –  withstanding extreme temperatures without melting – and included them in the soldiers’ rations.

Thus the iconic tagline “Melts in your mouth, not in your hand.” was born.

Celebrate with M.

Historical packaging + poster: © Mars, Incorporated

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