Bodies: Reshaped, recovered, submerged

the human form, art and the human form, mountaineering, body and perception, artifact retrieval, glacial archaeology, 25 Wonders of the World, global warming, alpine detritus,

I stumbled upon these three articles about the human body all in the same day. Putting them together seemed only natural.

Reshaped: Bodies of evidence

the human form, art and the human form, mountaineering, body and perception, artifact retrieval, glacial archaeology, 25 Wonders of the World, global warming, alpine detritus,

Is beauty only in the eye of the beholder? Or does it run deeper – entrenched in the culture of countries around the globe?

To investigate the perception of beauty, Superdrug Online Doctors commissioned Fractl to conduct the survey, Perceptions of Perfection. The goal: “to better understand potentially unrealistic standards of beauty and to see how such pressures vary around the world.”

Fractl invited one female graphic designer from 18 countries to Photoshop a female form – to make the model, in the designer’s opinion, more attractive to the citizens of their country. Each designer was given the same photo.

The results are extremely diverse. Ideal beauty was defined by different shapes and sizes. Some designers embraced a voluptuous figure to define their specific culture while others celebrate a disturbingly thin woman.

In an effort to combat body uniformity, Endangered Bodies is a global initiative founded to encourage women and men to accept the variety of shapes, sizes, colors and ages of all bodies.

Check out the complete story and results here.

Recovered: Bodies of work

the human form, art and the human form, mountaineering, body and perception, artifact retrieval, glacial archaeology, 25 Wonders of the World, global warming, alpine detritus,

For mountaineers, rising global temperatures create a different set of climbing problems at higher altitudes. Ice that has been permanent for thousands of years has begun to melt over the past two decades. That problem for climbers has created an exciting new discipline for scientists: Glacial archaeology.

For those lost on mountains around the world, melting snow causing glacial movement provides the opportunity to retrieve the departed and provide closure to the families. In addition to human remains, other items have been retrieved from snow and ice over the past few years on the Matterhorn due to movement, including the remains of a crashed American World War II bomber and a cache of jewels from a downed Air India flight in 1966.

Some argue – why risk lives for the long missing, while others claim that searching with helicopters and planes has uncovered more than waiting for glacial movement and meltdowns. But Martin Callanan of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology encourages the close examination of the retrieval area for clues to glacial behavior, “We simply never know where and when ancient frozen remains are going to appear.”

Read the complete BBC article here.

Submerged: Bodies of water

Molinere Underwater Sculpture Park, the human form, art and the human form, mountaineering, body and perception, artifact retrieval, glacial archaeology, 25 Wonders of the World, global warming, alpine detritus,

Molinere Underwater Sculpture Park, the human form, art and the human form, mountaineering, body and perception, artifact retrieval, glacial archaeology, 25 Wonders of the World, global warming, alpine detritus,

Sculptor Jason DeCaires Taylor grew up in Europe and Asia. As a child in Asia, he explored its coral reefs. Taylor went on to study sculpture in London. As a qualified diving instructor and underwater naturalist, he combined his love of both art and nature.

Molinere Underwater Sculpture Park – the world’s first – was founded by Taylor in 2006 and is listed as one of National Geographic’s top 25 Wonders of the World. Situated off the coast of Grenada, the environment is part of a protected area. The installation consists of 65 cement sculptures (casts of the locals) situated on the seafloor designed to promote coral growth, and in time, serve as a habitat for small marine animals.

Taylor’s several permanent, public aquatic projects have a practical, functional role in environmental protection, as noted on his website, “facilitating positive interactions between people and fragile underwater habitats while at the same relieving pressure on natural resources.”

Explore more of Taylor’s world and unique accomplishments here

Photo credits
1]  From Mountaineering Art by Harold Raeburn, 1920. This image is in the public domain.
2]  From Perceptions of Perfection, images labeled as fair use with credit link.
3]  From Wikipedia, Ötzi the Iceman © Helmut Simon, 19 September 1991
4]  From his website, © Jason deCaires Taylor

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